What is a Credit Card Number?

A credit card number is the long number printed on the front or back of your credit card . It is used to identify your credit card and is required for any financial transaction involving your card.

Credit Card Number?’ style=”display:none”>Checkout this video:

Introduction

A credit card number is the long number printed across the front or back of your credit card. It is used to identify both the issuer of the card and the cardholder. The credit card number is also used to validate the checksum of the card.

What is a credit card number?

A credit card number is the long set of digits displayed across the front or back of your card. It is unique to your card, and is used to identify both you and your account.

The first group of digits (the first six, in most cases) is your “issuer identification number” (IIN).The IIN identifies the financial institution that issued the card. The next group of digits ( usually nine)is your personal account number. The final digit is a check digit, used to verify that the credit card number you entered is valid.

How is a credit card number generated?

A credit card number is generated by a computer algorithm. The algorithm is designed so that each credit card number is unique. The first six digits of a credit card number are the issuer identification number (IIN), which identify the bank that issued the card. The next nine digits are the individual account identifier, and the final digit is a check digit.

The Luhn Algorithm

A credit card number is composed of a prefix, which is the major industry identifier (MII), and the individual account identifier. The industry identifier is used to identify the credit card issuer. The individual account identifier is used by the issuer to uniquely identify the account. The Luhn algorithm is used to validate the credit card number.

What is the Luhn Algorithm?

The Luhn algorithm or Luhn formula, also known as the “modulus 10” or “mod 10″ algorithm, is a simple checksum formula used to validate a variety of identification numbers, such as credit card numbers, IMEI numbers, National Provider Identifier numbers in the United States, Canadian Social Insurance Numbers, Israel ID Numbers and Greek Social Security Numbers (ΑΜΚΑ). It was created by IBM scientist Hans Peter Luhn and described in U.S. Patent No. 2,950,048, filed on January 6, 1954 and granted on August 23, 1960.

The algorithm is in the public domain and is in wide use today. It is specified in ISO/IEC 7812-1[1][2] which covers numbering systems for banking and related purposes — the only standard which explicitly mentions it (see External links below). Most credit cards and many government identification numbers use the algorithm as well;[3] each such number contains a check digit that can be determined by running the rest of the digits through the Luhn algorithm.

Luhn chose”Mod 10” because his primary interest was in developing a mechanism to detect typing errors rather than fraudulent usage.[4] This same check digit mechanism can be used regardless of the intended application for the number. For this reason the Luhn modulus has sometimes been called simply “the modulus 10”.[5][6]

When used for identification numbers other than credit card numbers (which are almost exclusively 16 digits long), two common variants exist: 14 digit identifiers such as DUNS often omit the final check digit for economical reasons,[7] while 8 digit identifiers such as UPCs use a modified variant of Luhn’s algorithm which treats each character from left to right as an independent number with value equal to its position in ordinal number notation starting from zero.[8][9][10]

How does the Luhn Algorithm work?

In credit card number verification, the Luhn algorithm or Luhn formula, also known as the “modulus 10” or “mod 10” algorithm, is a simple checksum formula used to validate a variety of identification numbers, such as credit card numbers, IMEI numbers, National Provider Identifier numbers in the United States, Canadian Social Insurance Numbers, Israel ID Numbers and Greek Social Security Numbers (ΑΜΚΑ). It was created by IBM scientist Hans Peter Luhn and described in U.S. Patent No. 2,950,048, filed on January 6, 1954 and granted on August 23, 1960.

The algorithm is in the public domain and is in wide use today. It is specified in ISO/IEC 7812-1[1] published in 1982 and CCITT Recommendation E.123[2] published in 1985[3] as Annex B. It is not intended to be a cryptographically secure hash function; it was designed to protect against accidental errors, not malicious attacks. Most credit cards and many government identification numbers use the algorithm as a simple method of distinguishing valid numbers from collections of random digits.

The IIN

Every credit card number is made up of a unique combination of numbers, which is known as the Issuer Identification Number (IIN). The IIN is the first six digits of a credit card number, and it identifies the issuer of the card. This number is used to verify the card when it’s being used for a transaction.

What is the IIN?

The IIN is the first six digits of a credit card number. It identifies the financial institution that issued the card to the cardholder. Also known as the Bank Identification Number (BIN), these identification numbers are used by merchants to route transactions to the proper acquirer. The remaining numbers on a credit card are used to identify the individual account number, and may be printed on the card.

How is the IIN used?

The IIN is the first six digits of a credit card number. It is used to identify the card issuer. For example, 448530 is the IIN for Visa credit cards. The IIN ranges from 34-37 for American Express, 6011 for Discover, and 51-55 for MasterCard.

The IIN is used to identify the card issuer and to prevent fraud. When a credit card is swiped, the IIN is sent to the card issuer along with the transaction information. The card issuer then verifies that the IIN is valid and that the account is in good standing. If everything checks out, the card issuer approves the transaction and charges the account.

The BIN

A credit card number is composed of a sequence of digits. The first six digits of a credit card number are known as the Bank Identification Number (BIN). The BIN is used to identify the card issuing institution. The next nine digits are the individual account number, and the final digit is a checksum.

What is the BIN?

The BIN, or bank identification number, is the first six digits of a credit card number. It identifies the issuer of the card. The BIN can tell you the type of card (such as debit or credit), the level of card (such as platinum or business), and sometimes the country where the card was issued. You may also hear it referred to as an IIN, or issuer identification number.

A BIN database is a collection of all assigned BINs and their associated information like card type, level, country, and so on. A good BIN database will be updated frequently so that you can be sure you’re always working with accurate data.

BIN databases are used by businesses for a variety of purposes, such as fraud prevention, Payments processing, and analytics. For example, if you run a business that ships products internationally, you can use a BIN database to verify that a customer’s credit card is from a country that you ship to. Or if you’re a payment processor, you can use a BIN database to route transactions to the right acquiring bank.

There are many different types of BIN databases available, but not all of them are created equal. When choosing a BIN database for your business, it’s important to consider factors like data accuracy and completeness, update frequency, price, and customer support.

How is the BIN used?

The BIN, or bank identification number, is the first six digits of a credit card number. It identifies the issuer of the card and is used to route transactions to the right bank. When you’re shopping online or by phone, the merchant will usually ask for your BIN as a way to verify that your card is legitimate.

There are a limited number of BINs assigned to each issuer, so they can be recycled when a cardholder closes their account or gets a new one. That’s why you might see a different BIN on your credit card from one month to the next.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a credit card number is a unique 16-digit code that is assigned to every credit card. This number is used to identify the card and its owner, and it is required for all financial transactions involving the card. It is important to keep this number safe and secure, as it can be used to commit fraud if it falls into the wrong hands.

Scroll to Top