How to Remove Disputes from Your Credit Report

If you’re trying to improve your credit score, one of the first things you’ll need to do is remove any disputes from your credit report. Here’s how to do it.

Checkout this video:

Pull your credit report

The first step to removing a dispute from your credit report is to pull your credit report from all three major credit bureaus—Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Look over each report carefully to find any inaccuracies, including errors with your personal information, accounts that don’t belong to you and negative items that should have been removed by now.

If you find any errors, file a dispute with the credit bureau online or by mail. The credit bureau has 30 days to investigate the error and remove it from your report if they find that it’s inaccurate.

If you don’t find any errors on your credit report, you can still try to have the dispute removed by contacting the creditor directly. Write a letter to the creditor explaining why you believe the dispute is inaccurate and ask them to remove it from your report. If the creditor agrees, they will notify the credit bureau and the dispute should be removed from your report within 30 days.

Identify the disputed items

The first step is to get a copy of your credit report from the credit reporting agency. You’re entitled to one free credit report from each of the three major agencies — Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — every year at AnnualCreditReport.com. Review your report carefully and identify any items that you dispute.

Each item will have a notice that it’s being disputed, and there will be an opportunity for you to add your own comments about the dispute. Be as specific as possible about why you believe the item is wrong and include copies of any documentation you have to support your position.

Gather evidence to support your dispute

If you find errors on your credit report, the first step is to gather any evidence you have to support your dispute. This might include canceled checks, loan documents, or other records that show the information on your credit report is not accurate. Once you have gathered your evidence, you will need to contact the credit bureau that is reporting the error and provide them with your documentation.

The credit bureau will then investigate your claim and if they find that the information on your credit report is inaccurate, they will remove it from your report. If you have items that are accurate but you feel are unfairly impacting your credit score, you can also dispute these items. The credit bureau will then investigate these items as well and if they agree that they are impacting your score unfairly, they will remove them from your report as well.

Send your dispute letter to the credit bureau

If you find errors on your credit report, you can dispute them with the credit bureau in charge of the report.

You’ll need to send your dispute letter to the credit bureau by certified mail, return receipt requested. In your letter, include:
-Your name, address and phone number
-A list of the errors you’re disputing
-Copy of documents that support your dispute (if you have them)
-A statement that you’re requesting an investigation
-A statement that you understand that the credit bureau will notify the company who provided the information if it finds your dispute is valid
-Your signature

The credit bureau has 30 days to investigate and respond to your dispute. If it finds that an error has been made, it will notify all three credit bureaus so they can correct the error on their reports.

Follow up with the credit bureau

If you have followed the steps above and the dispute is still not resolved, you can take additional steps by reaching out to the credit bureau directly.

If you have already filed a dispute with the credit bureau and it has not been resolved, you can follow up with the credit bureau by phone or mail. Be sure to include your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth in your correspondence. You should also include a copy of your credit report with the disputed item circled. In your letter, explain why you are disputing the information and ask that the dispute be resolved.

You can also reach out to the creditor directly to try to resolve the dispute. If you do so, be sure to include your name, address, Social Security number, and date of birth in your correspondence. You should also include a copy of your credit report with the disputed item circled. In your letter, explain why you are disputing the information and ask that the dispute be resolved.

Monitor your credit report

Disputes can happen for a variety of reasons, but if you find one on your credit report, it could negatively impact your credit score. That’s why it’s important to regularly check your credit report for any errors or discrepancies.

If you do find a dispute, don’t panic — there are steps you can take to remove it from your report. First, you’ll need to gather any supporting documentation that proves the dispute is inaccurate. This could include paperwork from the original creditor, bank statements or cancelled checks. Once you have this documentation, reach out to the credit bureau listed on your report and file a dispute.

The bureau will then investigate the claim and determine whether the dispute is valid. If it is determined that the dispute is valid, the bureau will remove the negative mark from your report. However, if the bureau finds that the dispute is not valid, they will leave the negative mark on your report.

You can also take steps to prevent disputes from happening in the first place by monitoring your credit report regularly and being proactive about any errors or inaccuracies you see. By taking these measures, you can help keep your credit score healthy and improve your chances of getting approved for loans and other forms of credit in the future.

Scroll to Top