How to Pay Off Student Loan Debt

It’s no secret that student loan debt is a huge problem in the United States. Learn how to pay off your student loan debt and get your life back on track!

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Assess your situation

Before you develop a plan to pay off your student loans, you need to take a close look at your overall financial situation. This includes your other debts, income, expenses, and financial goals. Once you have a clear picture of your finances, you can start to develop a plan to pay off your student loan debt.

How much debt do you have?

Student loan debt can feel like a heavy weight on your shoulders, but you’re not alone. In the United States, the average graduate has $28,400 in student loan debt, and the total amount of outstanding student loan debt is $1.2 trillion. If you’re struggling to make your student loan payments each month or if you’re worried about how you’re going to pay off your loans, there are options available to you.

Before you can develop a plan to pay off your student loan debt, you need to know how much debt you have. This number will vary depending on the type of loans you have and the interest rates associated with those loans. If you have private loans, your interest rate could be higher than if you had federal loans. The best way to get an accurate number for how much debt you have is to contact your loan servicer and ask for a statement of account. This document will show you the balance of your loans, as well as the interest rate and monthly payment amount.

Once you know how much debt you have, you can begin to develop a plan to pay it off. There are a few different options available to borrowers who are struggling to make their payments each month. You may be able to consolidate your loans or refinance your loans to get a lower interest rate and monthly payment amount. You can also look into income-driven repayment plans which base your monthly payment amount on your income and family size. These options can help make your monthly payments more manageable, but they will also extend the term of your loan and increase the amount of interest you pay over time.

If you’re struggling with student loan debt, there are resources available to help you get out of debt faster. Talk to your loan servicer about consolidation or refinancing options, or look into income-driven repayment plans. You can also use a student loan repayment calculator to see what different repayment options would cost you in terms of interest and time. With so many options available, there’s no reason to feel trapped by your student loan debt.

What is the interest rate on your loans?

Interest rates on student loans can vary widely, depending on the type of loan and the lender. Federal student loans typically have lower interest rates than private loans, but both types of loans can have either fixed or variable interest rates.

If you have a loan with a fixed interest rate, your payments will stay the same for the life of the loan. But if you have a loan with a variable interest rate, your payments could go up or down depending on changes in market interest rates.

To get an idea of what you might be paying in interest, you can use a student loan repayment calculator to estimate your monthly payments and total interest paid over the life of the loan.

Are you able to make payments?

If you’re currently unable to make payments on your student loans, don’t despair — there are options available to help you get back on track. The first step is to assess your situation and understand what options may be available to you.

There are several factors to consider when trying to determine if you can make payments on your student loans:
-Your current income and employment situation: Do you have a job? Are you able to earn enough money to cover your basic living expenses and make payments on your loans?
-Your other financial obligations: Do you have other debts that you need to pay? This includes things like credit card debt, car loans, or a mortgage.
-Your Total Debt Repayment Amount: This is the total amount of money that you would need to repay if you were to repay all of your debts. This includes interest and any fees that may be associated with your debts.
-Your disposable income: This is the amount of money that you have left after paying for your basic living expenses and other financial obligations. This is the amount of money that you would have available to make payments on your student loan debt.

If you’re struggling to make payments on your student loan debt, there are several options available to help you get back on track. These options include deferment, forbearance, and consolidation. You may also be eligible for income-based repayment plans orPublic Service Loan Forgiveness.

Develop a plan

The best way to pay off student loans is to develop a plan. You need to know how much money you owe, when your payments are due, and what your interest rates are. Once you have this information, you can develop a budget and start making extra payments on your loans.

Decide if you will pay extra each month

If you have the ability to pay more than the minimum payment each month, you can make significant progress in reducing your overall loan balance, and save money on interest over time. To decide if this is the right strategy for you, answer the following questions:

– Do you need to reduce your monthly payment to free up funds for other expenses?
– Are you comfortable with making small extra payments each month?
– Do you want to pay off your loans as quickly as possible?

If you answered “no” to the first question and “yes” to the second and third questions, then paying more than the minimum each month could be a good option for you.

Decide if you will make bi-weekly payments

You may have heard that making bi-weekly payments on your student loans can help you pay them off faster. But what does that actually mean?

When you make a bi-weekly payment, you are paying half of your monthly payment every two weeks instead of once a month. This may not sound like much, but it can add up over time.

The main benefit of making bi-weekly payments is that you end up making an extra payment each year. For example, if you have a $100 monthly student loan payment, you would end up paying $1300 per year. But if you make bi-weekly payments of $50, you would end up paying $2600 per year – or the equivalent of one extra monthly payment.

Making bi-weekly payments can help you pay off your student loans faster because you are effectively making one extra payment each year. And the more extra payments you make, the faster your loan will be paid off.

Of course, there are other ways to make extra payments on your student loans – like making a larger monthly payment or making an occasional additional payment when you can afford it. But if you’re looking for a way to automatically make extra payments each year, Bi-weekly payments are a good option to consider.

Develop a budget

The first step to getting your student loan debt under control is to develop a budget. You need to know how much money you have coming in and going out every month. Start by adding up your monthly income from all sources, including your job, investments, and any other source of income. Then, list all of your expenses, including your housing costs, food, transportation, child care, insurance, and any other regular expenses.

Once you have a clear picture of your finances, you can start looking for ways to cut costs and free up extra money to put toward your student loan debt. Consider making changes like downsizing your home, eating out less often, or carpooling to save on transportation costs. If you have extra money after covering your essential expenses, you can put that toward your student loans.

Consider consolidation

If you’re struggling to make your monthly student loan payments, you’re not alone. In fact, you’re in good company. According to a report from the Association of Young Americans, 70% of college graduates in the Class of 2018 graduated with student loan debt. The average graduate’s debt load was $29,800. But there’s hope. You can pay off your student loan debt.

What are the pros and cons?

The pros of consolidation are that it can lower your monthly payments, give you a single payment to make (rather than multiple payments), and potentially help you pay off your debt faster. The cons are that it could extend the life of your loan, and you might end up paying more in interest over the life of the loan.

Is it right for you?

If you’re struggling to make your monthly student loan payments, you may be considering consolidation. Student loan consolidation is an attractive option for many borrowers because it promises one monthly payment at a lower interest rate.

But is consolidation the right choice for you? As with any major financial decision, it’s important to do your research and understand all your options before consolidating your student loans.

Here are some things to consider before you consolidate:
-Your current interest rate: If you have federal student loans, you may be able to lower your interest rate by consolidating into a Direct Consolidation Loan. However, if you have private loans with rates lower than the federal Direct Consolidation Loan rate, you may want to keep your existing loans. Interest rates on private consolidation loans vary, so compare offers from multiple lenders to get the best rate. You can use Credible to compare private consolidation loans from multiple lenders in just two minutes.
-The total cost of repayment: When you consolidate federal student loans, you’ll generally extend the life of your loan and end up paying more in interest over time. If you consolidate private student loans, you may be able to choose a shorter repayment term and save on interest costs. Use Credible’s student loan refinancing calculator to see how much you could save by consolidating your private student loans.
-Your repayment options: If you have federal student loans, consolidation will give you access to additional repayment plans such as income-driven repayment and Public Service Loan Forgiveness. However, if you consolidate federal loans into a private consolidation loan, you will lose access to these plans.
-The type of debt you have: Student loan consolidation is only available for certain types of debt including federal Direct Loans, Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL), Health Professions Student Loans (HPSL), Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL), Federal Perkins Loans and Nursing Student Loans (NSL). You cannot consolidate private student loans or Parent PLUS Loans through a Direct Consolidation Loan – although Parent PLUS Loan holders can refinance into a private consolidation loan through Credible.

Make extra payments

The best way to pay off student loan debt is to make extra payments on your loans. This will help you pay off your loans faster and save you money in interest. You can make extra payments by making a lump sum payment, making bi-weekly payments, or making monthly payments.

When should you make extra payments?

You can make extra payments at any time. If you have extra money, you can make a lump-sum payment or increase your regular payments.

There are a few things to consider before making extra payments:

-Check if there are any prepayment penalties. Some lenders may charge a fee if you pay off your loan early.
-Make sure you’re not sacrificing other important goals, like saving for retirement.
-Consider the tax implications. Interest on student loans is tax-deductible, so you may want to speak with a tax advisor before making extra payments.

Ultimately, the decision to make extra payments comes down to your personal financial situation and goals.

How will making extra payments help you?

Making extra payments on your student loans can help you pay off your debt faster and save you money on interest. When you make a regular payment on your loan, a portion of the payment goes towards the principal (the original amount you borrowed) and the rest goes towards interest.

Payingextra each month means that more of your payment will go towards the principal, which will help you pay off your debt faster. And, because you will be paying less interest overall, you will also save money.

If you are struggling to make your regular payments, making extra payments may not be the best option for you. In this case, you may want to consider other options, such as refinancing your loans or consolidating your debt.

Stay on track

It can be difficult to stay on top of your student loan payments, especially if you have a lot of debt. But, there are a few things you can do to make sure you stay on track. First, create a budget and make sure you know how much you can afford to pay each month. Second, set up automatic payments so you never miss a payment. Lastly, stay in communication with your loan servicer so you can make adjustments if needed.

Set up reminders

One way to make sure you stay on track with your student loan repayments is to set up reminders. You can do this by setting up automatic payments from your bank account or by setting up a calendar reminder for yourself. Either way, making sure you have a consistent repayment plan will help you stay on top of your debt and avoid missing any payments.

Stay motivated

As you work to pay off your student loan debt, it is important to stay motivated. The best way to do this is to set realistic goals. Depending on the amount of debt you have and your income, you may be able to pay off your loans in a few years or it may take longer. Regardless of how long it takes, staying motivated will help you reach your goal.

Some things that can help you stay motivated include:
-Making extra payments on your loans each month.
-Setting up automatic payments so you never have to think about making a payment.
-Paying more than the minimum payment each month.
-Eliminating other debts so you can focus on paying off your student loans.
-Keeping a picture of what you’ll use the money for once your student loans are paid off (a new car, a down payment on a house, taking a dream vacation, etc.)
-Making a budget and sticking to it.
-Tracking your progress so you can see how much closer you are to reaching your goal.

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