How to Close Credit Card Accounts

A step-by-step guide on how to close your credit card accounts the right way.

Checkout this video:

Why You Might Want to Close an Account

Part of maintaining a good credit score is limiting the number of credit accounts you have open. So, if you have a credit card that you don’t use, you might want to close the account. Additionally, closing unused credit accounts can help prevent identity theft and fraud. In this article, we’ll provide some tips on how to close a credit card account.

You have too many credit cards

The more credit cards you have, the greater the temptation to spend. If you have trouble controlling your spending, it might be best to close some of your credit card accounts. This will help you focus on using and paying off the cards you still have.

Another reason to close some of your credit card accounts is to improve your credit utilization ratio. This is the amount of debt you carry compared to your credit limits. For example, if you have two credit cards with balances of $1,000 and $500 and credit limits of $2,000 and $1,000, your credit utilization ratio would be 50%. That’s considered high and could hurt your credit score. But if you close one of the cards, your ratio would drop to 33%.

You’re trying to improve your credit score

If you’re trying to improve your credit score, closing a credit card account can backfire. That’s because part of your credit score is determined by your “credit utilization ratio.” That’s the amount of debt you have divided by the amount of credit you have. So, if you have a $1,000 balance on a card with a $5,000 limit, your credit utilization ratio is 20%.

A lower credit utilization ratio can help your score. So, if you close an account that has a high balance, it will raise your credit utilization ratio and could hurt your score.

You’re trying to avoid temptation

If you have a problem with overspending, it may be best to close your credit card accounts. As long as the account is open, you’ll have the option to spend. If you close the account, you’ll have to go through the process of reopening it if you decide you need it again, which can be a deterrent to impulse spending.

How to Close a Credit Card Account

It’s important to know how to properly close a credit card account. Cutting up your card is not enough. If you close an account the wrong way, it can damage your credit score. Here is the right way to close a credit card account.

Call the issuer

The best way to close a credit card account is to call the issuer and speak to a customer service representative. If you have a balance on the card, you’ll need to make arrangements to pay it off before closing the account.

Keep in mind that closing a credit card account can impact your credit score, so be sure to weigh the pros and cons before making a decision.

##Here are a few things to keep in mind when you close a credit card account:

-If you have a balance on the card, you’ll need to pay it off before closing the account.
-Closing a credit card account can impact your credit score.
-You may lose any rewards or points associated with the card.

Cut up your card

Cut up your credit card so you can’t use it anymore. Destroy it completely so that you won’t be tempted to reactivate it later on. If you have more than one credit card, destroy them all so that you won’t be able to use any of them.

Monitor your credit report

If you have decided to close a credit card account, there are a few important things to keep in mind. It’s important to understand that closing a credit card account can impact your credit score, so it’s important to monitor your credit report after you close the account. You can get a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) once every 12 months at AnnualCreditReport.com.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may need to provide written notice to the issuer before you close the account. This is typically done by sending a letter through certified mail with a return receipt requested. In the letter, be sure to include your name, address, account number and statement date, as well as a brief explanation of why you are closing the account.

Once you have closed the account, be sure to remove any authorized users and cancel any automatic payments that are set up to be charged to the card. You will also want to shred or destroy the physical card so that it can’t be used by anyone else.

If you have any questions about closing a credit card account, be sure to contact the issuer for more information.

What to Consider Before You Close a Credit Card Account

It’s not uncommon to feel like you have too many credit cards. You may have opened a few too many in a moment of weakness or applied for a few too many in order to get a sign-up bonus. Whatever the reason, you may be considering closing a credit card account or two. But before you do, there are a few things you should take into consideration.

The account’s age

One key factor to consider before closing a credit card account is its age. Generally, you want to keep credit accounts open for as long as possible to maintain a healthy credit history — which is one of the most important factors in your credit scores. A longer credit history makes you look more responsible to lenders and can help boost your scores.

If you close an account that’s been open for a long time, you lose the positive impact it has on your credit scores. So, if possible, it’s best to keep older accounts open even if you don’t use them often.

Of course, there are exceptions. You may want to close an older account if it has an annual fee that’s no longer worth paying or if you’re trying to avoid temptation by keeping your number of available credit lines low. In these cases, it may be worth closing the account — just be aware of the potential impact on your credit scores.

The account’s credit limit

One of the things you’ll want to consider before you close a credit card account is the account’s credit limit. If you have a high credit limit, closing the account could have a negative impact on your credit score. That’s because your credit score is partly based on your “credit utilization ratio.” That’s the amount of debt you have compared to your credit limits. So, if you have a high credit limit and you close an account, your credit utilization ratio will go up, which could hurt your score.

The account’s balance

One of the things you’ll want to consider before closing a credit card account is the balance you currently have on the card. If you have a balance, you may be better off keeping the account open and paying it off over time. This is because closing an account can cause your credit score to drop, and you don’t want to damage your credit score if you’re trying to improve it.

Another thing to consider is whether or not you have any other outstanding credit card debt. If you do, then you may want to keep the account open so that you can transfer the balance to another card with a lower interest rate. However, if you don’t have any other debt, then paying off the balance and closing the account may be the best option for you.

You’ll also want to think about whether or not you’re planning on using the card in the future. If you are, then it’s probably best to keep the account open so that you don’t have to go through the hassle of re-applying for a new card later on. But if you’re not planning on using the card, then there’s no reason to keep it open, and it may be better to close it now so that you don’t have to worry about it later.

Bottom Line

It’s generally a good idea to close credit card accounts that you no longer use. That’s because keeping unused credit cards open can hurt your credit score, even if you don’t carry a balance on the card.

Weigh the pros and cons before you close a credit card account

Whether you’re trying to declutter your wallet or want to focus on paying off debt, you may be considering closing a credit card account. But before you do, it’s important to understand how closing a credit card can affect your credit score.

The first thing to know is that closing a credit card won’t immediately improve your credit score. In fact, in the short term, it may actually drop a few points. That’s because one of the key factors in your credit score is your “credit utilization ratio,” or the amount of debt you have compared to your credit limit.

For example, let’s say you have two credit cards with limits of $5,000 each. One has a balance of $3,000 and the other has a balance of $0. Your total debt is $3,000, and your total available credit is $10,000. That gives you a credit utilization ratio of 30%. But if you close the card with a $0 balance, your total available credit drops to $5,000 — and so does your credit utilization ratio, to 60%. That increase in your ratio could have a negative impact on your score.

There are other potential consequences of closing a credit card account as well. If you close an account that you’ve had for a long time — and that therefore has a long history — it could shorten the length of your overall credit history, which could also have a negative impact on your score. Additionally, closing an account could increase your “account mix” — meaning the mix of different types of accounts on your report — which comprises 10% of most scores. A lower account mix could also lead to a drop in your score.

So before you close any accounts, it’s important to consider all the potential effects on your credit score — not just in the short term but over the long haul as well. You may decide that the benefits outweigh the risks or vice versa. But either way, it’s important to go into the decision with eyes wide open so that you can make the best decision for your financial future

Scroll to Top