How to Calculate Interest on a Loan in Excel

You can calculate interest on a loan in Excel by using the “PPMT” function. This function will calculate the periodic payment for a loan based on an interest rate and the number of payments.

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Introduction

In order to calculate the interest on a loan, you will need to know the following information: loan amount, interest rate, and length of loan. With this information, you can use Microsoft Excel to calculate your monthly payment, total interest paid, and total amount paid on the loan.

Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet application that comes installed on most computers. If you do not have Microsoft Excel, you can download a free trial from Microsoft.com.

Once you have Microsoft Excel open, you will need to set up your spreadsheet. To do this, create headers across the top of the spreadsheet in columns A through D. In column A, type “Loan amount.” In column B, type “Interest rate.” In column C, type “Length of loan.” In column D, type “Monthly payment.”

Now that your spreadsheet is set up, you can begin entering your information into the cells. In cell A2, enter the loan amount. In cell B2, enter the interest rate as a percentage (for example, 6%). In cell C2, enter the length of the loan in months (for example, 60).

With this information entered into your spreadsheet, you can now calculate your monthly payment and total interest paid on the loan. To calculate your monthly payment in Microsoft Excel, use the “PMT” function. The “PMT” function stands for Payment function. To use this function in Excel, type “=PMT(B2/12,,A2)” into cell D2 without quotes (the parentheses around B2/12 tell Excel to calculate the monthly interest rate). This formula will give you your monthly payment amount including principal and interest (but not any additional fees).

To calculate the total interest paid on the loan over its lifetime, use the “CUMIPMT” function. The “CUMIPMT” function stands for Cumulative Interest Payment function. To use this function in Excel, type “=CUMIPMT(B2/12,,A2,,C2)” into cell E2 without quotes (the parentheses around B2/12 tell Excel to calculate the monthly interest rate). This formula will give you your cumulative interest payments over time (but not any additional fees). You can also use this formula to see how much interest you will pay in any given year by changing the last parameter from C2 to a specific year (for example: =CUMIPMT(B2/12,,A2,,5) will give you cumulative interest payments through 5 years).

Finally, to see how much money you will have paid in total at any given point in time ( including principal and additional fees), use the “PV” function . The “PV” function stands for Present Value function . To use this function in excel , type =PV(B2/12,,D3) into cell F3 without quotes . This formula gives you your current remaining balance on the loan including all payments made until that point ( it does not factor in any additional fees ). You can also use this formula see how much money would be left on the loan at any given year by changing D3 to a specific year , such as 10 years .

The Basics of Interest

Compound interest is interest that is earned not only on the original principal amount of a deposit or loan but also on the accumulated interest of previous periods. In other words, compound interest is “interest on interest,” and it can add up quickly.

To calculate compound interest in Excel, you can use the FV function. This function calculates the future value of an investment based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate.

The syntax of the FV function is as follows:

=FV(rate, nper, pmt, [pv], [type])

where:

rate: The annual interest rate.

nper: The total number of payments (including both principal and interest payments).

pmt: The payment amount (each period). This includes both principal and interest. To calculate only the interest portion of a payment, use PPMT. To calculate only the principal portion of a payment, use IPMT.
pv: The present value – the total amount that a series of future payments is worth now. If omitted, PV defaults to 0 (zero), which means that no initial investment is made and all returns are reinvestment income. For example, if you are making monthly investments into an annuity type: A number that indicates when payments are due:

0 or omitted End of period (default) 1 Beginning of period

How to Calculate Interest in Excel

You can use Excel to calculate the interest on a loan. You will need to have the loan amount, the interest rate, and the number of payments. You can use the PMT function to calculate the monthly payment. You will need to use the NPER function to calculate the number of payments. The interest rate will be the rate per period.

The Formula

The formula for calculating simple interest in Excel is:

interest = principal * rate * days / 365

where:
-principal is the initial amount of the loan;
-rate is the annual interest rate;
-days is the number of days from the date the loan was taken out to the date of repayment.

There are a few things to keep in mind when using this formula:
-The rate must be entered as a percentage, not as a decimal. For example, if the interest rate is 7%, you would enter 7% rather than 0.07.
-The number of days must include both the start and end dates. That is, if you take out a loan on January 1 and repay it on January 31, you would enter 31 for “days”.

You can use this formula to calculate both simple and compound interest in Excel. To calculate compound interest, simply use the same formula, but substitute “principal + interest” for “principal”.

The Data

In order to calculate interest in Excel, you will need to provide the following data:
-The loan amount
-The interest rate
-The length of the loan in years
-The number of payments per year

Conclusion

In conclusion, using Excel to calculate interest on a loan can be a quick and easy process. All you need is the loan amount, the interest rate, and the number of payments. With these three pieces of information, you can use the PMT function to calculate your monthly payment amount, and then use the NPER function to calculate the total number of payments. From there, you can use the FV function to calculate the total amount of interest that will be paid over the life of the loan.

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