How to Get a Cash Advance from Your Credit Card

If you’re in a bind and need cash fast, you may be able to get a cash advance from your credit card. However, there are some things you should know before you do this, as it can be quite expensive. Read on to learn more about how to get a cash advance from your credit card.

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Introduction

A cash advance from your credit card is a quick and easy way to get cash in hand, but it’s important to understand the fees and terms before you do. Here’s what you need to know about getting a cash advance from your credit card.

Most credit cards will allow you to withdraw cash at an ATM or through a teller at a bank. The cash advance limit is typically a portion of your total credit limit, and you’ll be charged interest on the amount you withdrawn from the date of the transaction until you pay it back in full. You may also be charged a cash advance fee, which is typically around 5%.

To get a cash advance from your credit card, simply go to an ATM or bank and withdraw cash against your credit limit. Be sure to bring your photo ID as most banks will require it when withdrawing cash from your credit card account. You may also be asked for your PIN number, so be sure to have that handy as well.

Withdrawing cash from your credit card account is easy, but it’s important to remember that you’ll be paying interest on the amount you withdraw from the date of the transaction until you pay it back in full. Additionally, most credit cards will charge a cash advance fee of around 5%. For these reasons, it’s best to use a cash advance only as a last resort or in case of an emergency.

How to Get a Cash Advance from Your Credit Card

Getting a cash advance from your credit card is a pretty simple process. You just need to know where to look and what to expect. Most credit card companies will let you take a cash advance from your credit card, but they will charge you a fee for doing so. The fee is usually a percentage of the amount you want to withdraw.

Find an ATM that accepts your card

Not all ATMs accept all credit cards. To find an ATM that accepts your card, use a search engine such as Google and enter “ATM” plus the name of your city. If you need help, call the customer service number on the back of your card.

When you find an ATM, insert your credit card into the machine and follow the instructions on the screen. You will likely be asked to enter your PIN. Once you are finished, your cash advance will be dispensed into your hand.

Withdraw cash from your account

Withdraw cash from your account by using your credit card at an ATM. Look for an ATM that displays the logo of your credit card issuer. To get a cash advance from your credit card, you’ll need to have your PIN number.

You can also get a cash advance by asking for one at a bank that offers advances from your credit card issuer. To do this, you’ll need to show the teller your credit card and ID. The teller will then run your credit card through their machine and give you the cash.

There is usually a fee for getting a cash advance, and the interest rate is higher than it is for purchases. For example, if your APR is 20% for purchases, it may be 23% for cash advances. You’ll also start accruing interest on the cash advance as soon as you get it, so it’s important to pay it back quickly.

It’s also important to remember that taking out a cash advance will lower your available credit limit, which could impact your ability to make future purchases with your credit card.

Repay the cash advance

Make sure you repay the cash advance as soon as possible. Most credit card companies will start charging interest on the cash advance as soon as you get it, so it’s important to pay it back quickly. Some cards may give you a grace period of up to 21 days before they start charging interest, but this is not always the case.

It’s also important to make sure you pay more than the minimum payment each month. This will help you pay off the cash advance faster and avoid paying extra in interest.

Fees and Interest

Fees

There are two primary fees associated with getting a cash advance: the cash advance fee charged by your card issuer and any ATM fees charged by the bank that owns the ATM from which you withdrew the cash.

Most credit card issuers charge a flat fee or a percentage of the total cash advance amount, whichever is greater. For example, if your card issuer charges a 3% cash advance fee and you take out a $500 cash advance, you’ll be charged a $15 fee ($500 x 3%). Or, if your card issuer charges a $5 flat fee for cash advances, you’ll be charged that same $5 fee regardless of how much money you withdraw.

ATM fees, on the other hand, can vary depending on the bank that owns the ATM. For example, Bank of America charges non-customers a $2.50 fee for using one of its ATMs, while Wells Fargo charges $3.00. And if you use an out-of-network ATM, you may also be charged a fee by both your card issuer and the bank that owns the ATM.

Assuming you’re being charged a 3% cash advance fee and you use an out-of-network ATM that charges $2.50 in fees, you’ll end up paying a total of $30.50 in fees for a $500 cash advance ($15 + $2.50 + $13).

Interest

If you use your credit card to take out a cash advance, you will be charged interest on the amount of money you borrow. The interest rate for cash advances is usually higher than the interest rate for purchases. For example, if the interest rate on purchases is 20% per year, the interest rate on cash advances might be 24% per year. This means that if you borrow $100 from your credit card company, you will have to pay them back $124 after one year (assuming no other fees apply).

Alternatives to Getting a Cash Advance from Your Credit Card

There are a few alternatives to getting a cash advance from your credit card. You can take out a personal loan, get a payday loan, or use a peer-to-peer lending service. Personal loans tend to have lower interest rates than credit cards, making them a better choice if you need cash right away. Payday loans are a good option if you have a steady income and can pay back the loan quickly. Peer-to-peer lending platforms like Lending Club or Prosper can be a good option if you have good credit and can wait a few weeks for the loan to be funded.

Personal loan

A personal loan is an unsecured loan that can be used for a variety of purposes, including debt consolidation, medical expenses, home improvements, or major life events like a wedding or a new baby. The advantage of a personal loan over a cash advance from a credit card is that the interest rate on a personal loan is usually much lower. Personal loans also have flexible repayment terms, so you can choose how long you have to pay back the loan. There are many online lenders that offer personal loans, so it’s easy to compare rates and find the best deal.

Home equity loan

A home equity loan is a type of second mortgage. Your “first” mortgage is the one you used to purchase your home, but you can place additional loans against the property as well — and a home equity loan is one of them. Home equity loans are sometimes called “second mortgages” because they are second in line to be paid off if your house goes into foreclosure.

Like a first mortgage, a home equity loan is secured by your home’s value — i.e., the loan is backed by collateral. If you don’t make your home equity loan payments, the lender could foreclose on your home and you could lose everything.

A home equity loan is different from a HELOC in several ways:
-A home equity loan is a lump sum, while a HELOC acts like a credit card with a credit limit and variable interest rate.
-You make fixed monthly payments on a home equity loan, but only minimum payments on a HELOC. Interest rates on home equity loans are usually higher than HELOCs because the interest rate is fixed for the life of the loan, while HELOCs have variable interest rates that can increase over time. Home equity loans also typically have shorter terms than HELOCs — usually 5 to 15 years vs. 10 to 30 years for a HELOC. And there may be fees associated with taking out a home equity loan, such as an appraisal fee or origination fee.

401(k) loan

You may be able to get a cash advance from your employer through a 401(k) loan. This is usually only an option if you have an immediate financial need and can’t get the money any other way.

The interest rate on a 401(k) loan is often lower than the rate you would pay for a cash advance on your credit card, and the money you borrow is tax-free. However, there are several disadvantages to taking out a 401(k) loan:

-You will have to pay the loan back within five years, or else it will be considered a withdrawal from your retirement account (and subject to taxes and penalties).
-The amount you can borrow is limited to the lesser of $50,000 or 50% of your vested account balance.
-If you leave your job for any reason, you will have to repay the loan immediately or it will be considered a withdrawal from your retirement account (and subject to taxes and penalties).

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